Rarefaction

Rarefaction is the portion of a sound wave where the air molecules are most spread apart and have the lowest pressure. This is the opposite of compression, which is the portion of a sound wave where the air molecules are closest together and have the highest pressure.

 

What is rarefaction in audiology?

In audiology, rarefaction is used to describe the part of a sound wave that is not as loud as the compression part. This is because the air molecules are spread apart more in the rarefaction part of the wave, which means that there are fewer of them to vibrate the eardrum.

What are normal hearing test results?

Normal hearing test results are when a person can hear sounds at a certain decibel level (dB) and frequency. For example, a normal hearing threshold for a 1000 Hz tone is 20 dB HL. This means that a person with normal hearing should be able to hear a 1000 Hz tone at a level of 20 dB HL.

What are the different types of hearing loss audiograms?

There are three main types of hearing loss audiograms:

  • Conductive hearing loss: This type of hearing loss occurs when there is a problem with the outer or middle ear. This can be caused by things like earwax buildup, ear infections, or damage to the eardrum.
  • Sensorineural hearing loss: This type of hearing loss occurs when there is a problem with the inner ear or the auditory nerve. This can be caused by things like aging, genetics, or noise exposure.
  • Mixed hearing loss: This type of hearing loss is a combination of conductive and sensorineural hearing loss.

How do hearing aids use sound waves?

Hearing aids use sound waves to amplify sound so that people with hearing loss can hear it better. The hearing aid has a microphone that picks up sound waves and converts them into electrical signals. These electrical signals are then amplified and sent to a speaker in the hearing aid. The speaker converts the electrical signals back into sound waves that are then transmitted into the ear canal.